Tag Archive | kids 5k

10 Lessons on How to Stay Active as a Family

If your New Year’s resolution is to get your family active, take a step back before you attempt to go 100 mph forward and read the 10 most important things we learned in 2012 about moving as a family.

1.  Physical activity is more important than weight loss. Being active improves both your physical and mental health, and how your body feels is more important than how your body looks. Especially when you’re a kid.

2.  Finishing first is not the most important part of running a race. So when your video-game-loving kindergartner wants to run a one-mile race, make sure you believe in him. He’s going to finish.

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3.  Moving doesn’t have to be serious. You can get a healthy dose of exercise while having fun playing games like ant hospital and toilet tag. Yep, those are real games. Seriously. Continue reading

Learning to Exercise for Fun: My Kids Before and After Zamzee

By Ann Greenberg

The Greenberg Girls

The Greenberg Girls

About a year ago I signed my daughters up for a 5k race and found out about a local company called Zamzee. Having spent the better part of the last 12+ years trying to keep my three darling daughters healthy and physically fit, I was intrigued by Zamzee’s claim to engage kids in a more active lifestyle. Days later, we had ourselves 3 shiny, pink meters. Unsure of what to do, I put the girls (then aged 7, 10 and 12) to work exploring the Zamzee.com website and signing up their meters. Almost instantaneously, the way my kids viewed physical activity changed…for the better.

Let me backtrack and age myself a bit first by saying I grew up in the era of riding bikes to school (helmet-free of course), playing at the local park with friends until dusk, swimming in the neighbors pool and heading home, on my own, before the street lamps went on. I didn’t play on 3 different teams year round, I didn’t watch what I ate, and I was a healthy size with little or no effort.

When I started a family of my own, I never expected to struggle to find the time and energy to keep my family healthy, fit and active. Kids today exercise in a structured and organized form. There is no walking to school for my children. Even riding bikes is an effort that usually requires loading 3+ bikes into a too small car and driving someplace remote and safe to do so. In my attempts to keep my kids active, I pull my hair out with complicated daily carpools to and from a half dozen different athletic fields, and I find myself spending hours in my car.

So when these shiny little Zamzee meters entered our world, I had no idea what I was in for.

Continue reading

How (NOT) to Help Your Kid Train for a One-Mile Running Race

By Andrew Kardon from Mommy’s Busy… Go Ask Daddy!

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Ryan

I hate running. I really do. My wife, however, loves it. She doesn’t seem to mind that crazy awful feeling that your lungs are about to pop like a balloon. She’s run a few 5Ks and even a half marathon. I love rooting her on and think it’s great inspiration for our kids.

My five year old, Ryan, is a typical boy who loves video games, action figures, and imaginative play. He’ll toss a football with me in the backyard for a good 10 minutes, but then he’s done. If things ever get too tough, he just gives up and moves on.

So when my wife signed up for a local 5K to benefit our neighborhood schools, she mentioned that there’s also a kids’ one mile race. Ryan said he wanted to sign up. Yeah, I think I fractured a tooth when my jaw hit the floor.

Knowing full well that Ryan’s one of those kids that will change his mind more times than a teenage girl changes her outfits, I didn’t expect him to follow through. We asked him multiple times, though, and he insisted he wanted to do it, so we signed him up.

About a month before the race, we figured Ryan should practice running to build up some stamina. So Ryan ran to the end of our street, stopping once or twice on the way. That was maybe 1/8th of a mile.

He was out of breath. He was winded. He was exhausted. But he still insisted that he could run the race. Continue reading